UWM French film festival prompts cultural dialogue

Fabienne Bullot knew she had found a city of kindred spirits when she left the 2013 Milwaukee Film F...

Survey: MPD is failing at public relations

Successful community policing is built on positive relationships between law-enforcement officials a...

'Family source' confirms that Bruce Jenner is transitioning to female

Multiple media are reporting that Bruce Jenner is transitioning to female. A “family source” told P...

Walker ramps up presidential campaign

Shifting his focus to Washington — far away from the stubborn issues facing his struggling state — W...

Coalition sues EPA over factory farm pollution

A coalition of groups that includes Clean Wisconsin is suing the Environmental Protection Agency, cl...

Wisconsin groups join petition to reclassify gray wolves under Endangered Species Act

Animal protection and conservation organizations petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to re...

House Republicans move toward lawsuit against Obama's immigration orders

House Republicans are moving toward authorizing a potential lawsuit against President Barack Obama o...

MSO performs Leonard Bernstein’s ‘Age of Anxiety’

Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra veteran guest William Wolfram returns to Milwaukee on Feb. 6 and Feb. 7...

Shell eager to drill off Alaska's northwest coast

Royal Dutch Shell PLC will move forward with drilling off Alaska's northwest coast if it can obtain ...

At 82, Joel Grey publicly comes out as gay

Joel Grey has publicly announced at age 82 that he is gay. The Oscar- and Tony-winning actor tells ...

Florentine Opera sings to the heart for Valentine’s Day

From a little light music to A Little Night Music, Milwaukee’s Florentine Opera will once again cele...

A birthday party fit for a Stradivarius, at Frankly Music

From roughly 1700 until his death in 1737, Italian luthier and crafter Antonio Stradivari produced m...

  • UWM French film festival prompts cultural dialogue

    Saturday, 31 January 2015 12:50
    Published In: Film
  • Survey: MPD is failing at public relations

    Saturday, 31 January 2015 11:17
    Published In: Editorial
  • 'Family source' confirms that Bruce Jenner is transitioning to female

    Saturday, 31 January 2015 08:10
    Published In: WiGWAG
  • Walker ramps up presidential campaign

    Saturday, 31 January 2015 06:37
    Published In: Wisconsin
  • Coalition sues EPA over factory farm pollution

    Friday, 30 January 2015 13:55
    Published In: Environment
  • Wisconsin groups join petition to reclassify gray wolves under Endangered Species Act

    Friday, 30 January 2015 13:39
    Published In: Wisconsin
  • House Republicans move toward lawsuit against Obama's immigration orders

    Friday, 30 January 2015 11:46
    Published In: Trending News
  • MSO performs Leonard Bernstein’s ‘Age of Anxiety’

    Friday, 30 January 2015 11:28
    Published In: Music
  • Shell eager to drill off Alaska's northwest coast

    Friday, 30 January 2015 11:26
    Published In: Environment
  • At 82, Joel Grey publicly comes out as gay

    Friday, 30 January 2015 11:07
    Published In: Trending News
  • Florentine Opera sings to the heart for Valentine’s Day

    Friday, 30 January 2015 09:34
    Published In: Music
  • A birthday party fit for a Stradivarius, at Frankly Music

    Friday, 30 January 2015 09:12
    Published In: Music

Right-wing bias, political jockeying conspire to derail Milwaukee’s streetcar proposal

Passengers look out from an Atlanta streetcar.
— Photo: AP/David Goldman

Streetcars and light rail systems are central to America’s growing re-urbanization — the counterpunch to last century’s urban flight. Although critics often dismiss them as “trendy,” you’ll find such systems today in down-to-earth cities such as Oklahoma City, Kansas City and Cincinnati. Leaders in conservative metro areas such as Salt Lake City rave about them. They’re an integral part of 21st–century urban landscapes in nearly every corner of the nation — Portland and Seattle, Tucson and Phoenix, Atlanta and Nashville, Philadelphia and Boston.

Many of the cities that have added streetcars or light rail to their public transportation options over the past couple of decades consider them great successes. Portland, Oregon, which pioneered the streetcar’s return, reports that $3.5 billion has been invested within two blocks of its streetcar lines, resulting in 10,212 new housing units and 5.4 million square feet of office, institutional, retail and hotel construction.

Amid presidential campaign, Walker’s deficit balloons to $2B

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker will have to plug a roughly $280 million budget shortfall by the end of June, and the state faces a two-year deficit that could be as large as $2 billion, based on new estimates released from the nonpartisan Legislative Fiscal Bureau.

When Walker took office in 2011, the state faced a roughly $3 billion budget shortfall, based on agency requests. Walker declared that the state was “bankrupt” then, an assertion that was supported by the media.

Somehow, there’s no mention of “bankruptcy” in the right-wing media this time around.

Oxfam: Richest 1 percent sees share of wealth jump

The combined wealth of the richest 1 percent will overtake that of the other 99 percent of people next year unless the current trend of rising inequality is checked, according to an analysis released by Oxfam International.

The Sets List: Death Blues, Fleetwood Mac, Riff Raff and more

Death Blues. — PHOTO: Courtesy

Jon Mueller’s Death Blues 

High court sets stage for historic ruling on marriage

The U.S. Supreme Court this spring will take up cases seeking to overturn bans on same-sex marriage in four states, setting the stage for a national — and historic — ruling on the freedom to marry in America.

Out on the town

‘The Kreutzer Sonata’

Jan. 24 to Feb. 15 

‘Good People’

Jan. 21 to Feb. 15

‘The Beautiful Dark’

Jan. 23 to Feb. 7

‘Stargirl’

Jan. 16 to Feb. 15

‘True West’

Jan. 15 to 31

'The Other Place'

Jan. 15 to Feb. 1

WiGWAG: News with a twist, Jan. 29, 2015

image_news_wigwag_012915_c

A “patriot” restaurant owner in Wyoming, Michigan — a town that appears to suffer from identity issues — has banned Michael Moore and Seth Rogen from his Brann’s Steakhouse and Grille for their outspoken criticism of the Oscar-nominated movie American Sniper. Our hunch is the two well-fed celebrities can find elsewhere to chow. 

‘Once On This Island’s’ story pits love vs. death

Kanova Johnson in Skylight’s Once on this Island.
— Photo: Mark Frohna

Former artistic director Bill Theisen is back at the Skylight, and boy, does he have a story to tell.

Salvatore’s brings tomato pies to Madison

One of Salvatore's Pies. — PHOTO: Danielle Chaviano

A young Bob Dylan, passing through Madison in the late 1960s, is rumored to have said that the best things about Wisconsin’s capital city were its pizza and its Quaaludes.

Communities enact bans on GMO crops

A protest at the Jackson County Court House in Oregon.
— Photo: AP Photo/The Mail Tribune/Jamie Lusch

Two Oregon farmers are defending a local ordinance in federal court in a campaign to protect their harvests and create a zone free of genetically engineered crops.

Welles centennial celebrated in Madison, Kenosha

Orson Welles. — Photo: UW-Madison Cinematheque

A century ago, on May 6, 1915, Kenosha found itself the birthplace of one of the greatest film directors of all time: Orson Welles.

'Good People'? More like 'Great People'

The Rep's Good People is at the Quadracci Powerhouse.
— Photo: Michael Brosilow

There’s a funny contrast at the heart of Good People. Its heroine is Margie, a South Boston mother working paycheck to paycheck who runs out of paychecks. She earns our sympathy almost immediately, with a can-do spirit and relentless drive. But most of us in the audience aren’t Margies.